Saturday, March 1, 2014

Texas State Sets Enrollment Record


Texas State University hit an all time enrollment of 35,568 students for Fall 2013. This marks the 16th consecutive year for Texas State to set a new record for total enrollment.

With the increase in student population, the diversity of Texas State's campus is growing. Minorities now make up 42 percent of the student body. Hispanic enrollment increased 12 percent and African-American enrollment increased 14 percent.

“We are most pleased that our efforts to recruit students from all backgrounds has led to a truly diverse population at Texas State,” said Texas State Provost Eugene Bourgeois.

The growth of Texas State's student population has not gone unnoticed by current students.

"I think that the increased enrollment has mostly affected me in regards to where I go on campus. I tend to avoid the quad and the lair because I know there will be a lot of students there" said senior Jasmine Williams.

With an increase of students and a limited number of professors some of the class sizes have also increased. "I have bigger classes with over 300 kids and there's not really a lot of one-one-time with the teacher" said sophomore Shelby Madden.

On the other hand Benjamin Vo, a freshman from Canada, is not bothered by the class size. "I'm not one to really talk to the teacher" said Vo.

The increased enrollment may have some negative affects for student like freshman Alexandria Ballew who commutes from San Antonio. The "increased enrollment has impacted the parking at Texas State" and "often has a hard time parking on campus" said Ballew.

While some students look at the negative effects of the growth on campus others look at the positive.

Students like senior Zachary Nelson who is the Director at PAWS Preview for Texas State welcome the growth. "The more people we have here at Texas State, the more reputable we look, the better we look for those of us that are getting a degree here. We can say, 'hey we are one of those large universities that is wanting to be reckoned with', so if anything it's just been a positive experience" said Nelson.

For students like junior Jerome Finney the growth and size of the university does not bother them. "I enjoy going here despite the population and I love Texas State and there's nothing like it" said Finney.

Texas State University will continue to grow, which will increase the amount of Bobcats in the workforce.

Once a Bobcat, Always a Bobcat.


Texas State Attendance Record

San Marcos Texas- Texas State University has set a new record of enrollment, it was recently announced that the current enrollment up to fall semester of 2013 was 35,568 students. This is an increase from the enrollment from the 2012 fall semester.
 “We take our role in preparing the next-generation work force in Texas very seriously, so it is gratifying to see that so many incoming students are choosing to attend Texas State,” President Denise M. Trauth said. She also mentioned that Undergraduate enrollment also reached a new record of 31,032, an increase of 1,574 students. "Of those, a larger number of freshmen from the top 10 percent of their graduating class were among this group than in previous years," Trauth said.
There have been many different opinions from students, Junior Kelly Michelle is not against the university growth but she just does not think that there will be more space for more students. “Yeah so it can become a bigger school. I don’t think there is any more space. What else are they going to build?” Kelly, a current student said. Hallie Casey a current junior at Texas State University said “I think the main way that the increased enrollment is affecting the students on a personal level is, I feel like the population of the campus is growing faster than the infrastructure, so I feel like we’re putting a lot of stress on our school as a whole.”
Some students see the increase of students as something good to increase university’s income. “Why not? More people means more money. Everybody likes more money.” Ryan Motley, a current student said.
Rachel Garner a senior student was not even aware of the record attendance but she believes that the university has to keep growing. She believes that everybody has the right to receive education and that we need a country with more educated people. “University has to keep growing so people can get education. We need more smarter people with education.”
Texas State’s student body continues to diversify, with minorities making up 42 percent of the student body. Preliminary numbers indicate Hispanic enrollment increased 12 percent to a record 10,682, and now comprises 30 percent of the student body. African-American enrollment increased 14 percent to 2,824 and accounts for eight percent of the university population.
This record has become a new challenge for students and the university itself. Most of the current students commented that their decision of enrolling at Texas State University was not affected by the university growth, “No, I was influenced by [who] the cello professor [is]. The size of the school didn’t have anything do to with my choice to come here.” Rachel Garner a current Texas State University student said.
“As the demographics of Texas continue to shift, it is important that our institutions of higher learning adequately reflect the growing diversity of this state, so we are most pleased that our efforts to recruit students from all backgrounds has led to a truly diverse population at Texas State,” Texas State Provost Eugene Bourgeois said.
Other highlights include the Ingram School of Engineering reporting record-setting enrollment of 731 students, a 21 percent increase from last fall.
Enrollment at Texas State’s Round Rock campus totaled 1,783, including 33 students in the new Master of Science in Nursing (Family Nurse Practitioner) program.

Texas State University set a new record, and it seems that it will keep growing and setting new records from now on. 


Increased enrollment increases expectations

By: Aissa Vallecillo

SAN MARCOS- Record-breaking enrollment at Texas State this fall has forced change and growth throughout the city of San Marcos; and while some students seem to be tolerant, others are worried. According to a press release issued by university officials, this is the 16th consecutive year enrollment has broken its record at 35,568 students attending last fall semester of 2013. 

For PAWS Preview director Zachary Nelson (pictured on the left), the increase in enrollment increased the number of students that attended the PAWS Preview program last August. The general intent of the program is to help incoming freshman or transfer students to get more familiar with the campus. The university expects an even higher number of students to attend PAWS Preview in the fall of 2014.

"It means we have to plan for a bigger program, larger groups, and we just have to make sure that we have the facilities to accommodate to the large groups of people," said Nelson. 

It is the opinion of some, including Zachary Nelson, that the rapid growth of the university's student body creates a positive image for the students that are attending. 

"The more people we have here at Texas State, the more reputable we look, the better we look for those of us that are getting a degree here," said Nelson.  


Further, the increase in enrollment has created more of a sense of diversity here on campus. International student and health administration major, Benjamin Vo, is pleased with this change. 

"We are most please that our efforts to recruit students from all backgrounds has led to a truly diverse population at Texas State," Vo said. 

The diversity has also helped expand the mind of Shelby Madden, an elementary education sophomore.


"You get different viewpoints. I had a few international students in my class and it's cool to learn and hear different stories. I've made friendships with a lot of diverse people. It's a better experience," Madden said. 

On the contrary, rapid increase in population means that the construction is at an all time high, and puts negative stress on students and residents of San Marcos. Criminal justice major, Zachary Nelson, was very vocal about the issues that come along with the construction on campus and surrounding areas.

"It means you have to wake up way earlier to get to class if you ride the busses, and you have to plan around a lot of things," said Nelson. "...it's negatively affecting the San Marcos experience for the people who are just coming here for the first time this year. Now it seems like everywhere you go, it is blocked off because of the construction."

"I feel like the population of the campus is growing faster than the infrastructure, so I feel like we're putting a lot of stress on our school as a whole," said junior Hallie Casey.

"People just aren't going out and experiencing this beautiful city because there's nothing left pretty to experience because we're tearing it all up," Nelson added. 

In addition to the construction, there is a lack of space for music education major, Rachel Garner. 

"We don't have enough space [for our ensembles to rehearse], nor do we have enough practice rooms," explained Garner. 


Despite the hardships that come along with any rapid increase in population (like Texas State is experiencing), the pros seem to outweigh the cons. 

"I think [the university] should [continue to grow]. It's a positive thing," said Tayren Mangolini-Thomas.


There is no doubt that the university will need to continue to take action when it comes to efficiently accommodating to the growing population. Zachary Nelson has faith that the university will prevail.

"It's not like the blame needs to go somewhere, it just needs to get fixed as soon as possible so that this city can go back to being the beautiful campus that it is."


For more information about Texas State University, visit www.txstate.edu

Friday, February 28, 2014

Growth at Texas State Leads to Record Numbers and Increased Diversity


Enrollment at Texas State is at a record high for the 16th consecutive year. 35,568 students were enrolled in the 2013 fall semester, surpassing the previous record of 34,225 the previous year. This larger student body is also more diverse than previous years with 42 percent of the student body composed of minorities. 
“We take our role in preparing the next-generation work force in Texas very seriously, so it is gratifying to see that so many incoming students are choosing to attend Texas State,” said University President Denise M. Trauth. “This new high in student enrollment demonstrates that Texas State continues to be a leading university in the state, and that students and their families recognize our institution offers both an outstanding educational experience as well as an exceptional value.”
Many Texas State students share Trauth's enthusiasm about the growth at the university. Jerome Finney, a junior studying psychology, views this growth as beneficial to the university and it's students. As a peer mentor for the undergraduate service PACE, Finney works with a lot of students and sees this growth first hand.
"I think the bigger Texas State gets the more known we get for being big contributors in the work force," said Finney. "I enjoy going here despite the population. I love Texas State and there's nothing like it."
Junior Jerome Finney is excited about the record growth at Texas State.

The 2013 freshman class reached a record high at 5,181. This is a 22% increase from the previous year and has contributed greatly to the school's increasing population and growth.
PAWS Preview director Zachary Nelson is excited about the growth at Texas State, but knows that it is not without it’s challenges. Nelson now has to plan for bigger programs to accommodate incoming freshman, but still thinks the growth is beneficial to the university.
"The more people we have here at Texas State, the more reputable we look,” said Nelson. “If anything it's just been a positive experience."
The quick growth on campus is praised by many, but it is not without some complaints. Many students worry about increased construction throughout campus and the city of San Marcos interfering with their lives, while others fear decreased standards to increase numbers.
"I feel like the population of the campus is growing faster than the infrastructure, so I feel like we’re putting a lot of stress on our school as a whole," said Junior Hallie Casey. "I think that it's important for growth but I don't want to see our standards of enrollment drop just to get more numbers."
"I think it's okay for Texas State to want to continue to grow but I think that they need to make facilities more accessible for the growing number of students." said Jasmine Williams, a Texas State senior who shares concerns about continued growth. "I tend to avoid the quad and the lair because I know there will be a lot of students there and I take different routes around the UAC."
Sophomore elementary education major Shelby Madden also views increased enrollment as a mixed bag.
"It's good that it's growing, but it's growing too fast and it's happening all at once," said Madden. "I have bigger classes with over 300 kids and there's not really a lot of one-on-one time with the teacher." 
Along with its concerns and praises the rapid growth at Texas State also brings diversity. Minorities now make up 42 percent of the student body. Hispanic enrollment has increased by 12 percent, and African American enrollment has increased 14 percent.
Andrea Ballew is a freshman at Texas State this year. She is a part of the growth here and views it's larger numbers and diversity as a positive, a sentiment that many students here share.
"I like seeing all the different people and meeting new people who see things differently than I do.” 
            Texas State Provost Eugene Bourgeois is also pleased with the diversifying population.
“As the demographics of Texas continue to shift, it is important that our institutions of higher learning adequately reflect the growing diversity,” said Bourgeois. “…we are most pleased that our efforts to recruit students from all backgrounds has led to a truly diverse population at Texas State.”

Another Record for the Bobcats

The current population of Texas State now stands at 35,568 students, an increase of 1,343 students.

“We take pride in preparing the nest-generation workforce in Texas very seriously, so it is gratifying to see that so many incoming students are choosing to attend Texas State,” President Denise M. Trauth said.

“…Students and families recognize that our institution offers an outstanding educational experience,” said Trauth

Texas State-San Marcos has shown considerable success over the past decade and a half and the new Round Rock campus has seen a significant growth of its own with a student population totaling 1,783 students; 33 of which are currently enrolled in the new Master of Science in nursing program.

Freshman left the biggest impact when it came to the increase of the total student body. 2013 brought in 5,181 freshmen, a 22 percent increase from 2012. Nearly half of the incoming freshmen were in the top 25 percent of their high school graduating class.

Trauth stated that a large number of the freshman we’re in the top 10,percent of their graduating class.

Not only has the freshman class shown an increase in size but also the overall ethnic diversity has seen some changes of its own.  Minorities now make up 42 percent of the entire student body. Hispanics saw the biggest increase to 10,682, up 12 percent from last year and comprising nearly a third of the overall student population.

“We are pleased that our efforts to recruit students from all backgrounds has led to a truly diverse population at Texas State,” Texas State Provost Eugene Bourgeois said.

While a growing population may display the prominence Texas State is currently undergoing, the student body’s outlook varies on the increased traffic.

Creative writing junior Ryan Motley
“I don’t think there is any more space. What else are they going to build?” Texas State junior Kelly Middleman said.

“When I was a freshman, campus wasn’t as packed as it is now but it’s gotten a lot bigger,” fellow junior Jerome Finney said.

Not all feel that the size of the university has become a strain. “More people means more money. Everybody likes more money,” creative writing junior Ryan Motley said when asked if he thought the school should continue to grow.

“I think that they need to make facilities more accessible for the growing number of students." Jasmine Williams said on the same subject.

While it’s uncertain if the increasing size of Bobcat Nation will deter further applicants, students didn’t seem to make their decision on coming to Texas State based on the total student population.

“I like seeing all the different people and meeting new people who see things differently than I do,” freshman Alexandria Ballew said.

Many students have come to meet new faces whereas others attend for a particular mentorship.

“I was influenced by [who] the cello professor [is],” music major Rachel Garner said.


“As the demographics of Texas continue to shift, it is important that our institutions of higher learning adequately reflect the growing diversity of this state,” Bourgeois said.

-Conor Reese Yarbrough

Texas State Experiences Record Growth

SAN MARCOS - Texas State has announced the most diverse student body in the school’s history, which is part of a record setting enrollment of 35,568 as of the fall 2013 semester.
This is the 16th consecutive year that Texas State has set a new record for total enrollment.
“This new high in student enrollment demonstrates that Texas State continues to be a leading university in the state, and that students and their families recognize our institution offers both an outstanding educational experience as well as an exceptional value,” President Denise M. Trauth said.
The growth in the number of students has not gone unnoticed by the general student body. One way it affects students is through class sizes.
“I have bigger classes with over 300 kids and there’s not really a lot of one on one time with the teacher,” sophomore Shelby Madden said. “It’s good that it’s growing but it’s growing too fast and it’s happening all at once.”
Despite the large class sizes, Madden added that the diverse student body has exposed her to different views and stories.
“I’ve made friendships with a lot of diverse people,” Madden said. “It’s a better experience.”
Along with the total enrollment, undergraduate enrollment also reached a new record of 31,032, an increase of 1,574 students, which was mostly driven up by a record incoming freshman class.
Senior Jasmine Williams said that the increased enrollment mostly affected her in regards to where she goes on campus.
“I tend to avoid the quad and the lair because I know there will be a lot of students there, and I take different routes around the UAC,” Williams said.
Other students question the university’s ability to adapt to the new numbers.
“I feel like the population on campus is growing faster than the infrastructure, so I feel like we’re putting a lot of stress on our school as a whole,” junior Halle Casey said.
However, some students welcome the large numbers and argue that it helps the university’s reputation in the academic and professional world.
“The more people we have here at Texas State, the more reputable we look, the better we look for those of us that are getting a degree here,” senior Zachary Nelson said. “We can say ‘hey, we are one of those large universities that is wanting to be reckoned with,’ so if anything it’s just been a positive experience.”
The increase in enrollment has also created an increase in diversity, with minorities now making up 42 percent of the student body.
“As the demographics of Texas State continue to shift, it is important that our institutions of higher learning adequately reflect the growing diversity of this state,” Texas State Provost Eugene Bourgeois said. “We are most pleased that our efforts to recruit students from all backgrounds has led to a truly diverse population.”
Despite the question of whether or not the university can keep up with the growth, students are still flocking to Texas State.

“I enjoy going here despite the population,” said junior Jerome Finney. “I love Texas State, and there’s nothing like it. College isn’t just an education, it’s an experience.”